Acupuncture Mind Body Connection

This is an extract of an article I had published in the North American Journal of Oriental Medicine (NAJOM), March 2019. The topic is: Acupuncture and the Mind-Body Connection. Below is a part of the English version and a Japanese translation…


Acupuncture and the Mind-Body Connection

Traditional oriental medicine is unique in the degree to which it recognizes the emotions as a cause of disease. Excess grief damages the lungs. Worry damages the spleen. Fear weakens the kidneys. Anger affects the liver and joy affects the heart.

In this article, I would like to explore the mind-body connection and how we literally “wear our emotions on our sleeves.” Our physical bodies can reflect the life we have experienced – our hurts, successes, habits, and mindsets. Our hurts are imprinted as body armour. The release of these tensions constitutes healing of the spirit on a fundamental level.

Author Rachel Naomi Remen writes:

Healing may not be so much about getting better, as about letting go of everything that isn’t you – all of the expectations, all of the beliefs – and becoming who you are. Not a better you, but a realer you.” (Moyers 1993).

In this article, I would like to explore how this “letting go” of our mental, emotional, and physical blockages constitutes a form of healing.

Body Reflects Mind

Psychologist Ken Dychtwald PhD wrote the following of his encounter on a training course with Core Energetics founder Dr John Pierrakos (a Core Energetics principle is that emotional, mental, and physical disturbances are symptoms of blocked energy):

“It is September 1970. I am standing naked before a roomful of men and women of all ages. Dr John Pierrakos is staring intently at my body, as are all the other people in the room.

Dr Pierrakos walks towards me and carefully examines the texture of my skin and the overall quality of my body’s musculature. He asks me to walk around the room for a few moments so that he can observe my body in motion. John Pierrakos proceeds to tell me about myself.

He tells me about my mother and my father and about my relationship to both of them. He describes my general attitudes regarding life, love, relationships, movement, change, and performance. With remarkable accuracy, he describes the sorts of relationships and styles of behaviour that I would normally seek out and tells me about the way I deal with them. For a finale, he describes my major personality strengths and weaknesses.

What was frightening about this experience was that everything he said, every observation he made, every description he offered, was entirely accurate.” (Dychtwald 1977, p. 4)

The Body is a Canvas

The body has many stories to tell us if we know how to read it. To give an example from Dychtwalt’s book: “raised shoulders are an indicator of fear or a paranoid state of mind. The forward hunched shoulders indicates a person who sees themselves as highly vulnerable.” This “folding-over” of the shoulders is the body’s way of “protecting” itself.


genki self health Japanese moxibustion acupuncture 2


Meeting the Patient

These examples show the importance of using all our senses, especially observation and palpation, when meeting a patient. The practitioner becomes an antenna as soon as they come into contact with the patient – whether on the phone or in the clinic.

What is the quality and timbre of the patient’s voice? Is there power, or is it suppressed? What does their gait and posture tell you? Are there any particular mannerisms? And then ask yourself ‘why?’ What in this person’s life has led to this?

Feeling the body, are there any areas that are unduly tight? This may indicate body armoring, where emotions are held. The channels in these areas will also be restricted.

The body scan

A technique I have adapted is a body scan. This type of exercise activates the right brain, the intuitive brain, which may furnish us with insights about the patient.

With the patient on the table, I take a few deep breaths and tune into a meditative or qigong-like state. It can be carried out whilst taking the pulse or palpating channels. Sometimes, insights about the person come to mind, and may be worth mentioning to see if they are of any significance to the patient.

John Hicks’ Body Exercise

I attended a seminar in Amsterdam with Five Elements teacher and author John Hicks. Hicks recommended a specific exercise: find a relaxing place to sit by the side of the street and simply observe people walking past. He suggested that you experiment, and adopt their way of gait. By doing this, you can gain a bodily insight into how that person moves, possibly even their unique imbalances. However, Hicks warned, you have to be careful not to do it too much, in case you actually take on their disease!

Trauma Leaves a Mark

Some diseases are not just physical. They may have evolved from childhood experiences or other negative experiences, for example – bereavement, parental divorce, abuse, rape, bullying, or guilt from not living up to a parents expectations. Some incidents are painful and cut deeply. If you can build trust with the patient, they may confide in you. It is here that listening, a non-judgement attitude and empathy is important.

These highly charged experiences can have a long-lasting impact on the being as a whole, and result in body armoring. At a basic level, this armoring restricts the flow of qi in the channels through the affected area.

Stirring the Muddy Pond

As acupuncturists, we have to figure out the best way to proceed. Body armor is there for a reason – to facilitate survival. Breaking it down too quickly risks destabilizing the person’s psyche.  It is like stirring a stagnant pond with a stick. It disturbs but does not clear the mud. On the other hand, whilst this armoring protects, it also suffocates. So some of this tension needs to be released. We must become like a garden fork, picking out bits of blanket weed from the pond.

Whilst we can simply treat problems as they appear and have some success with that, we can miss an opportunity for a deeper healing of the spirit.

Shudo Insight

I attended the In-Touch seminar in Japan with Shudo Denmei in 2017, where he demonstrated his Super-Rotation Insertion technique. Shudo spoke about healing the spirit and that his technique can benefit the emotions. He went so far as to say that even if your treatment does not change the problem the patient came for, an improved mood reflects a positive change.

I have experienced this to be true. Whilst I have had some success in treating a person’s physical problems, I feel so much more satisfied when I hear they feel better mentally and emotionally or were able to release emotions by crying or opening up to someone. I believe that a deep level of healing is occurring.

*****

End of extract: The complete article contains a final case study.

*****

References

Moyers B. 1993. Healing the Mind. Wholeness – Rachel Naomi Remen. Doubleday, New York

Dychtwald K.  1977. Bodymind.New York: Tarcher/Putnam, 1977.


Subcribe to NAJOM

To read the original article and other articles on Oriental Medicine, with a special emphasis on Japanese systems of Acupuncture, subscribe to the North American Journal of Oriental Medicine (NAJOM) – links to NAJOM website.

The NAJOM Journal is written in both English and Japanese. Below is the Japanese translation of the article – Acupuncture and the Mind-Body Connection:

Next Post

Acupuncture and Chemotherapy: Contraindications & Guidelines

*****


Blind Acupuncture in Japan


Related Posts

鍼灸と精神-体の関係性

伝統中国医学は、感情が病気の原因になると認めている点で独特だ。過度の悲しみは肺を傷つける。心配は脾臓を傷つける。恐れは腎臓を弱らせる。怒りは肝臓に、喜びは心臓に影響を与える。

この記事では、精神と体の関係性と、私たちは、文字通りどのように’感情を身にまとっているのか’を探っていきたい。私たちの体は、痛み、成功、習慣そして価値観などの人生経験を反映しているといえる。受けた痛みは体に刻み込まれ、よろいのようになっていく。このような緊張を解き放つことが、基本的なレベルの精神の癒しをもたらす。

作家のレイチェル・ナオミ・リメンは、以下のように書いている。

”癒しとは、良くなることではないかもしれない、それは、全ての期待、信念など、あなたではない全てのことを解き放つことであり、あなた自身になることなのだ。よりよいあなたではなく、より本当のあなたに。”(モイヤーズ、1993年、P343)

この記事では、癒しをもたらす、この精神、感情、身体的閉塞を ”解き放つこと” について探って行きたい。

体は価値観を反映する

心理学者のケン・ダイチトワルド博士は、コア・エナジェティクスの創始者であるジョン・ピエラコス博士との、彼の訓練コースでの出会いについて以下のように書いている。(コア・エナジェティクスの考え方では、感情、精神そして身体の乱れは、詰まったエネルギーの症状としている)

”1970年9月。私は、部屋いっぱいのあらゆる年齢層の男女の前に裸で立っていた。ジョン・ピエラコス博士は、部屋にいるその他の人々と同じように、私の体を熱心にじっと見ている。

ピエラコス博士は私に向かって歩いてきて、注意深く私の肌の質感や、体全体の筋肉組織の質を調べた。彼は私にしばらく部屋を歩き回るよういい、体の動きを観察した。続いて、ジョン・ピエラコスは私自身のことを話し始めた。

彼は、私の母、父、そして私と彼ら二人の関係について述べた。人生、愛、人間関係、行動、変化そして能力に対する私の一般的な傾向について述べた。驚くべき正確さで、彼は普段私が探し求めている人間関係の種類や行動様式を描写し、私がそれにどう対処しているかを述べた。最後に、彼は私の性格の主な長所と短所を描写した。

この経験で驚いたのは、彼が言ったこと、観察したこと、述べた特徴が全て正確だったことだ。”(ダイチトワルド、1977年、P4)

キャンバスとしての体

体はキャンバスだ。見方を知れば、たくさんの物語を私たちに教えてくれる。ダイチトワルド博士の本から例を出すと、”上がった肩は恐れや、パラノイア状態の精神を示す。前方に丸まった肩は、自分のことをとても脆弱だと思う人を表している”という。 この’巻き込まれた’肩は、体が自分を’守る’方法なのだ。

患者を診る

これらの例は、 患者を診る時、特に目診や脈診の際に、全ての感覚を使うことが重要だと教えてくれる。それが電話越しであっても、診療所でも、施術者は患者に接するとすぐにアンテナになる。

患者と話してみて、声の質や響きはどうか?力がこもっているか、押し殺されているか?歩き方や姿勢は何を教えてくれるだろうか?特別な癖はあるか?そして自分自身に、’なぜ?’と問うのだ。この人の人生の何がこれに導いたのか?

体に触れて、過度に張りつめたところはないだろうか?これは、体をよろいにしてしまった感情が詰まっている所かもしれない。このような場所の経絡も流れが制限されるだろう。

私が適用したテクニックは体のスキャンだ。この種の訓練は、直感的な脳である右脳を活性化し、患者についての理解をもたらしてくれるかもしれない。

施術台の上の患者を前に、私は数回深呼吸をし、瞑想か、気功を行う際の状態に自分を合わせる。脈をとり、経絡の脈診や触診を行う間それが続くこともある。時々その患者に関することが心に浮かぶことがあり、それがその人にとって意味があるかことかどうか聞いてみる価値もある。

ジョンヒックス氏のボディエクササイズ

私は、アムステルダムで行われた、Five Elementsの講師であり著者でもあるジョン・ヒックス氏のセミナーに参加した。ヒックス氏は、ある訓練を勧めてきた。それは、道の片隅にリラックスして座れる場所を見つけて、通り過ぎて行く人々をただ観察するというものだ。彼は、その人たちの歩き方を真似して実験することも提案した。そうすると、その人の動き方や、独自の不安定さも体で理解することができるのだ。しかしヒックス氏は、その人の病気までもらってこないように、実験をやりすぎないように警告している!

トラウマは体に跡を残す

病気は身体的なものだけではない。幼少期の経験や、人生で起こったネガティブな経験によって発生するかもしれない。例えば、死別、親の離婚、虐待、レイプ、いじめ、または親の期待通りに生きてこなかった罪悪感などだ。その中には深く、痛みを伴う出来事もある。もし患者と信頼関係を築くことができれば、それを打ち明けてくれるかもしれない。ここでは話を聞く事、決めつけない態度、共感することが重要だ。

このような強烈な経験は、その人の存在そのものに長期にわたって影響を及ぼし、結果的に体をよろいにしてしまうことがある。基本的なレベルで、このよろいはその場所を通る経絡の気の流れを制限してしまうだろう。

泥の池を混ぜる

鍼灸師として、私たちは最良の方法を見つけていかなければならない。よろいになった体には理由がある。生存を楽にするためだ。一気に壊してしまえば、その人の精神を不安定にする危険がある。それは棒で泥の淀んだ池をかき混ぜるようなものだ。かき混ぜることはできても、きれいにはならない。よろいは身を守ってくれるが、一方で息苦しくもある。よって、このような緊張は解き放つ必要がある。私たちは、池の藻を取り出すガーデンフォークのようにならなければならない。

現れた通りの問題をただ施術し、良い結果を得ることはできるが、より深い精神の癒しの機会を逃すこともあるのだ。

首藤氏の洞察力

2017年、私は日本で行われた首藤傳明氏のイン・タッチセミナーに参加した。そこで彼は超浅刺というテクニックの実演があった。首藤氏は、精神の癒しと、彼の技術が感情によい影響を与えることについて話した。そして、たとえ初めに患者が改善したかった問題に変化をもたらさなくても、施術後に気分が良くなればポジティブな変化が起こっているとも言ったのだ。

私はこの話が真実だという経験がある。患者の身体的な問題を施術して成果を得られたことはあるが、その患者が精神的、感情的に気分が良くなったり、泣いたり誰かに何かを打ち明けたなど、感情の解放ができたと聞くとより満足する。より深いレベルでの癒しが起こっていると信じているからだ。

訳:河合里恵

参考文献

Moyers B、「Healing the Mind」、Wholeness (Rachel Naomi Remen)、1993年、Doubleday、New York、P343

Ken Dychtwald、Jeremy P. Tarcher、「Bodymind」1977年、Putnam、New York、P4