Qigong Chinese medicine channels

This is my first log for the 30 day experiment of doing a 10 minute practice of Spontaneous Qigong every day. For a primer to this trial, click here.

It may be that the challenge sounds too simple to achieve. 10 minutes really isn’t that long a practice session.

There are some practical reasons for this short practice time: I have a small child in the ‘terrible 2’s’ stage that takes a lot of my time and I have a limited window of time for myself. Also, starting any kind of practice and doing it consistently can be quite challenging, so this is just as much a trial of my discipline as it is of doing physical exercise.

Working on a spontaneous qigong article to accompany this experiment

I am also using a lot of my spare time working on my website as well as currently writing an article on spontaneous Qigong to go along with this experiment, hence my limited time.

In fact this aricle is becoming longer the more I get into it. The first draft of it has now passed the 12,000 word stage, which means I am considering whether I should turn it into another ebook.

However, I would like people to read it in the future, so if I made it into an ebook, I essentially cut it off behind a kind of paywall. In this case, if the article does get so long that I do turn it into an ebook, I will make a large portion of it available on this website so people can access it and read for free. And then they can decide if they want to purchase the rest of it for their Kindle or sign up to my mailing list for a free PDF version of it. I think that sounds a fair deal.

For readers who are unfamiliar with what spontaneous qigong is, the article I am working on will give an introduction and explanation into this kind of practice. Spontaneous Qigong is probably not all that well-known and in some ways can be considered kind of mysterious. Yet it is accessible to everyone. I am not an expert in it, but I don’t really see any experts out there writing about it.

Day 1 of Spontaneous Qi practice.

In my introduction to this trial, I wrote that I find it fairly easy to enter into a spontaneous Qigong state. After writing this, I did wonder what would happen if I would not be able to enter the state so easily? Particularly as I have not practiced it for a few weeks. In that case, my trial would be over before it had even began.

Fortunately, I was able to enter into it within a few minutes of holding a standard Qigong standing pose. After a few minutes of standing, I could feel a gentle swaying motion and all I had to do was let my body take over. At that point, I started my session.

I have not done any physical exercise, no stretching, not anything for weeks now. Whenever I stop exercising, my posture always gets a bit bad. So I was curious what kind of exercises the spontaneous Qi would lead me into doing. It probably had a lot of work to do on a lazy bugger like me to clear my channels.

Qi Movements

The movements started off with side to side bending, over and over again. Just side to side, left to right, right to let, over and over again for 5 minutes.

If you do this kind of exercise consciously you would probably easily get fed up with it, but if you let spontaneous Qi lead it, you can do it much longer. However, as I have not been doing exercise recently and I am out of condition, I did find it a bit tiring.

The gallbladder channel runs along the sides of the body. It may be that this side-bending is a way to stretch out that particular channel. Or it just may be a way for my body to open up the waist area, which contains the dantian (energy field) and hara. I really don’t know, this is just conjecture, but my body’s Qi did seem to favour the side to side movement a lot in this session.

Mix it up

After 5 minutes I suppose I was getting bored and so I kind of wanted to experience some different movements.  My body still continued the side to side bending for a while, but soon the movements started changing to hand shaking, circles and body shaking. Some of my arm movements were similar to those in the Qigong set of exercises – the 8 pieces of Brocade.

Accommodating my movements to match my surroundings

At one point I had the urge to start running on the spot, but I had to override this as we have a ground floor neighbour who was in at the time. I didn’t want to cause her any inconvenience and so I did run a little on the spot but not too heavily.

I recall reading that when the legs want to do this kind of exercise – like running on the spot, it means the body is trying to open up the Qi channels in the leg.

Other than that lower body exercise, I mostly did a lot of hand shaking, and especially shaking of my fingers. The ends of the fingers are points where the channels change from one Channel pathway to another, so they are really dynamic energy ports. I feel that this hand shaking may have been a way to open up and clear the channels of my arms. It may even have been a way to clear some stagnant Qi, but I can’t say if that is true or not. Again it is just conjecture.

Qi movement reflection

Overall I noticed that many of my movements were quite gentle and not so erratic. On reflection, I would say this is because in the past I have done a fair amount of Qi work. In the early days of doing spontaneous Qi, my movements were much more dynamic and lively, however, over time they have become more gentle, precise and more measured.  I think this is a common pattern as your Qi channels become more open and clearer.

Despite this, there must be blockages as I really haven’t practiced this type of Qigong (or any Qigong) all that much over the last few 10 years. I have had the odd sporadic period of intense practice, but not kept it up regularly. So it will be interesting to see what the spontaneous Qi movements look like.

Bringing the session to an end

After 15 minutes passed, I consciously told myself the practice was finished. I put my hands on my dantian and then lay down and rested. For a few minutes, I was able to relax. Actually I felt much calmer mentally after doing this short practice, and so I’m glad I did it. It taught me just how beneficial Qigong can be for the mind and body. It’s like a combination of light physical exercise and relaxation.

Residual effects

Later on in the evening, I did feel the urge to stretch out my hands and feet, flex and relax them continually. I take this to be a residual sign of spontaneous Qigong occurring.

In this situation, I let it happen as I felt no inconvenience with doing it. I was watching a Japanese TV drama on the net at the time called ‘Soshite, Daremo Inaku Natta’ (And Then There Were None). It stars Fujiwara Tatsuya (of Kaiji fame) and which I think is inspired by the Agatha Christie novel. The plot is a bit convoluted with twist after twist, but it has kept me hooked.

So it’s a nice way to exercise whilst being entertained. But other than that, nothing else to report.

Overall, I am happy with my first day of this experiment.

Next Log

Click here for day 2 of my spontaneous qi practice log.

 

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